LSAT VS MCAT

LSAT VS MCAT

I’d like to start by saying that these two(2) tests are very different from each other. Asking which is harder than the other is like asking what’s more dangerous between fire and hailstone— If you were asked to punish a wild animal with any of them, which would you deem fit right and choose for punishment?

I wouldn’t want to give you a vague answer so I’ll just simply answer that.

Which is harder than the other? The MCAT over the LSAT? Or the LSAT over the MCAT?

In this article, you’ll find out the comparison between both tests.

Let’s take a look at both tests’ structures for better understanding.

Is The MCAT Harder Than The LSAT?

No, the MCAT is not harder than the LSAT. This is because both tests don’t have any binding relationship, therefore, it’s not appropriate to compare them in terms of their difficulty. People have speculated about which is harder than the other— even those who have not taken both tests before!

Research has shown from those who took both tests that the difficulty of both tests depends on the skills of those taking them. For instance, if you’re good at thinking logically and are an adept reader, the LSAT would certainly be a bit easier for you and not difficult.

Furthermore, you can’t be someone who’s not good at memorizing advanced facts, reading a wide range of topics— some aren’t even interesting reads but lots of practical and boring ones like organic chemistry, sociology, philosophy, and statistics but to mention a few! And you expect the MCAT to not be difficult?

Do you understand better now? Both tests are not made up of the same structure so you can’t compare them in terms of difficulty— which is harder than the other. It all boils down to your ability. LSAT is more of an aptitude test while the MCAT requires you to have intense background knowledge of content.

Having explained why the MCAT and LSAT don’t need to be compared in terms of difficulty, let’s look at how you can be better at both tests. We’ll treat each of them individually.

3 Tips To Help You Maximize Your MCAT Preparation.

If your dream is to become a doctor, it’s more important now than ever to do well in your MCAT. Below are the tips to help maximize your MCAT preparation.

1.   Build A Strong Foundation.

A common misconception is that MCAT Preparation commences a month before the exam. In reality, it starts the moment you begin your Biology/Chemistry class as a pre-med. When going through your prerequisite classes, you must focus on building a foundation of knowledge— not just so you can get an A in the class but so you can learn and retain the information in the long run.

The best way to accomplish this is by using the spacing effect— study a little each day for weeks to months instead of trying to cram everything at the last minute. By repeated exposures to a piece of information at increasing intervals between each repetition, you will optimize memorization and retain information in the least amount of time.

2.  Build An Effective MCAT Study Schedule.

The more time you spend studying for MCAT, the more likely you start forgetting information. A few months of intensely high-quality study will often beat up a year of low-intensity studying.  2 and a half months at the lower end to 6 months at the upper end is the sweetest spot for MCAT preparation for most students.

 

This time frame allows you to maximize information acquisition and retention, and minimize forgetting. To accomplish this, find a time which you’ll dedicate a few months to high-intensity MCAT study. Ideally, 40-50 hours per week for about 3 months would be fine. Come up with a schedule for reviewing each subject once you have your time frame picked out!

3.   Prioritize Active Learning Technique Over Passive Ones.

Never rely too heavily on passive learning techniques— reading through content review books, highlighting the important points, and rereading the highlights until they stick.

The issue with this technique is that it’s painfully inefficient and takes more time to consolidate key facts to memory than if you were to spend that time doing active learning— Practicing questions and using flashcards.

Also, it makes it more difficult to determine what areas need more improvement but active learning will help you learn information and hone test-taken methods. Make sure to review all questions.

3 Quick Tips On How To Prepare For Lsat.

Your LSAT score is the most important of the admission process. It’s more important than your GPA, essay, or where you went to school. You just have to improve how you study for it.

1.   Don’t Look For Shortcuts.

The LSAT is an extremely well-made exam. Your score is a reflection of how you do fairly on other test papers. Always look for ways to be better and faster but don’t try to gain this test.

2.   Get Yourself The Best Study Tools Available.

There is a huge range of LSAT quality products out on the market and the quality doesn’t necessarily pertain to the price.  Take your time to search for quality tools that will work best for you!

3.   Plan Ahead.

Getting better at the LSAT is largely about developing the right mental muscle memory, and Habits— For how you think about and solve questions. Developing these habits takes time. Give yourself enough time to develop these habits.

Conclusion

Before reading this article, you might have been finding it difficult to choose which one to write between these two tests, probably because you didn’t know which was harder than the other. But I’m sure that after reading this article, you can decide properly now!

Drop a comment below on how helpful this article was to you.

FAQS

 

Can I Take The MCAT Without Studying?

No, you can’t! You have to have solid background knowledge for you to do well in the MCAT.

Can I Get Into Law School Without Taking The LSAT?

Yes, you can. Although, not all schools would take you unless you take the GRE test in place of the LSAT.

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